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Mooncat

Turkey Day Trivia

* The first Thanksgiving celebration lasted three days.

* The Pilgrims didn't use forks.

* Only about one-third of the original colonists were Puritans.

* The Mayflower's crossing took 66 days.

* It's unclear if the Pilgrims at turkey at the first Thanksgiving.
At the time, "turkey" meant any kind of fowl.

* Evidence indicates that turkeys have been around for more
than 10 million years. And scientists say they are the stupidest
bird.

* The typical 15-pound turkey is 70 percent white meat and 30
percent dark meat. Give me the dark. It is moister.

* The Pilgrims did not eat cranberry sauce at the first Thanksgiving.
and they missed out on one of the best parts of the meal.

* It's time for me to take a nap while you read on.

* Turkey eggs hatch in 28 days.

* A nest of turkey eggs is called a "clutch."

* A baby turkey is called a "poult."

* A male turkey is called a "Tom." A female turkey is called a "hen."

* A mature turkey has about 3,500 feathers.

* The "caruncle" is the reddish, fleshy growth on the head and upper
neck of a turkey. The red, fleshy growth from the base of a turkey's
beak that hangs down over the neck is called the "snood."

* More than 45 million turkeys are consumed during Thanksgiving.

* The average weight of a Thanksgiving turkey is 15 pounds.

* Cranberries are also called "bounceberries."

* The Mayflower weighed 180 tons.

* There were at least two dogs on the Mayflower.

* Pilgrim children, boys and girls, wore linen or wool dresses up
until the ages of seven or eight.

* The Mayflower was a merchant vessel. Before transporting the
Pilgrims, the ship was in the wine trade, and before that, in the
fish trade.

* The pet food industry uses about 13 percent of U.S. turkey
production.

* In the typical Pilgrim household, adults sat down to dinner while
the children waited on them.

* The first native Americans to introduce themselves to the Pilgrims
were Samoset and Squanto.

* The Wampanoag chief invited to the first Thanksgiving feast was
named Massasoit.

* Ninety-five percent of Americans eat turkey on Thanksgiving.

Comments

Have a great one.

*hug*
*Big Grin*
Okay, are you baiting me?
You know this is right up my alley.
Too late tonight but maybe tomorrow I'll make a few 'corrections'.
Example: Mayflower was rated as 180 ton merchant ship. Rating is different from weight.
*Run off to bed before Kirin smacks the lion*
No, not trying to bait you at all.
This was a cut 'n paste job from another list.
Ah, okay.

Well maybe I'll still fill in some of the gaps. Heck that's what I do for fun out at Plymoth Plantation anyway. People this time of year coming to hear about Thanksgiving and we have to burst their bubble by telling them all we had was a harvest feast the first year. No the indians didn't come again, no they don't understand thanksgiving (for the English there that was a day of prayer not feasting), no deer and goose was the main meat not turkey, etc.

Still it's teaching them history as it really was not as some 19th century writers made it seem to be.
"I seriously thought.... Turkey's could fly."
- The one redeeming moment from the TV series, "WKRP in Cincinati"

Yep, that whole segment with Les doing the Hindenburg type commentary was priceless.

I miss that show ...
"I seriously thought.... Turkey's could fly."
Oh and can they fly! Every year we get cars that have their windshield or radiator taken out by some of these airborne banquets. It is also quite startling to get buzzed by a bird that large.

Another point that people don't understand is that wild turkeys are far from dumb creatures. Domestication is what has made that type dumb but in the wild they are very crafty birds.

Now as for the variety you have in DC...

A Little Thanksgiving History Lesson-Part 1

Well I promised some corrections (errors were not Smrgol's fault) on this Thanksgiving reflection. True to my word and my training at Plymoth Plantation I have now produced it. I just hope I don't bore anyone to death. Oh and because of limits of LJ's reply size it's in two parts.
=====
Only about one-third of the original colonists were Puritans.
Actually they weren't puritans but separatist. This was a group who felt that the Church of England couldn't be purified and left. Because they couldn't worship the way they wanted to in England (Everyone had to attend the King's Church) they went to Holland. They came to America not because they wanted religious freedom but because they couldn't support their families living in a foreign country and their children were becoming more Dutch than English.

The Mayflower's crossing took 66 days.
Correct, but that was only the crossing to Cape Cod. They were on the ship for more than a month before that and didn't reach the place they finally built Plymoth (17th century spelling of Plymouth) until a month after that. Before it was all said and done they spent more than a half year aboard the ship.

It's unclear if the Pilgrims at turkey at the first Thanksgiving. At the time, "turkey" meant any kind of fowl.
In the time we are talking about the word ‘turkey' referred to a type of Guinea-fowl that the English were acquainted with. It is very likely that the resemblance between those and the wild turkey cocks of American gave them that name. It is likely that the most common fowl at the Harvest Feast we think of as Thanksgiving was duck or goose. Goose would have been preferred by the English traditions.

The Pilgrims did not eat cranberry sauce at the first Thanksgiving. and they missed out on one of the best parts of the meal.
Bog berries (cranberry) were known by them but because in their natural form they are very sour the amount of sugar that would have been needed to use them was prohibitive. Present day cranberry products are heavily sweetened.

A mature turkey has about 3,500 feathers.
And you know it if you've ever had to pluck one.

There were at least two dogs on the Mayflower.
Yup. Goodman Peter Brown brought a Mastiff and a Spaniel with him.

Pilgrim children, boys and girls, wore linen or wool dresses up until the ages of seven or eight.
The ‘gown' was common dress for all children back in the 17th century and before. It was a right of passage when a child got their first set of ‘adult' clothing. The gown also had sewn into the shoulders ‘leading strings' which were strips of linen tape used to pull the child away from danger such as walking into fire or water.

Re: A Little Thanksgiving History Lesson-Part 2

The Mayflower was a merchant vessel. Before transporting the Pilgrims, the ship was in the wine trade, and before that, in the fish trade.
Records on the Mayflower are sketchy at best. Mayflower was a very common name for ships at the time. What has been traced indicates that the ship was involved in the wine trade with Bordeaux. Because a certain amount of wine always leaked into the bilge of the ship it made Mayflower a ‘sweet ship'. That is it prevented a rapid build up of bacteria in the bilge which is where much of the human waste of the passengers would have gone due to the crew not allowing them on deck even to relieve themselves in any but the calmest of weather. After Mayflower returned it is reported that she resumed her old trade.

In the typical Pilgrim household, adults sat down to dinner while the children waited on them.
The master (husband) of the house would always be seated and the wife and children would set the table and serve the meal. Children would serve after this with the possible exception of older children, especially males, in a household with servants. Several families in Plymoth had servants when they came over.

The first native Americans to introduce themselves to the Pilgrims were Samoset and Squanto.
Samoset was the first to make contact with them as they were building their first houses. In mid March he walked into the village, greeted them in broken English and asked for beer. He had learned English from contact with fisherman who would come each year. He introduced them to Squanto (or Tisquantum) who had been taken as a captive years earlier and spent much time in England finally returning with Master Dermer who explored parts of New England. He escaped and returned to the lands that Plymoth was built upon for his village had been there but found all his people dead from disease. Squanto acted as a guide and interpreter for them until he died near the end of 1622.

The Wampanoag chief invited to the first Thanksgiving feast was named Massasoit.
Massasoit, whose people were actually less numerous then many of the other local peoples, brought ninety men with him which made the English worry about how much food would be consumed during the feast. Massasoit however dispatched some men and they returned with five deer to add to the feast.

Thus endth the history lesson. For more info goto Plymoth Plantation's Web Site